Jan 12, 2014

Ann Coulter and God’s Word

English: Commentator and author at CPAC in .
English: Commentator and author at CPAC in . (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Ann Coulter and God’s Word
In her New Year’s Eve essay (her eighth almost identical Kwanzaa essay in 14th years), Coulter argued that the Bible should be taken seriously and not misinterpreted for political purposes. She added this aside: “(I promise you, except for venereal disease and eternal damnation, life would be a lot more fun if we were making it up as we went along.)”
Some have misread Coulter’s parenthetical remark as an expression of what befalls those who reject and disobey God’s Word. Yes, Coulter commends God’s Word yet, at the very same time, seems to commend doing your own thing (“making it up as we [go] along.”) Are “venereal disease and eternal damnation” the only consequences to sin? Is life all about seeking “a lot more fun?” Amazingly, Coulter made a “promise” about life being more fun doing things your own way. (Yet another failed Coulter promise.)
All actions have consequences – according to Newton and according to God. Coulter might think “life would be a lot more fun” doing it her way instead of God’s, revealing her ignorance of God’s greatness and His grace: our Father in heaven really does know better what is best for us. Jesus came to give us life, and to give it to us abundantly.
The apostle Paul exhorts Christians to “Rejoice! And, again I say, rejoice!” We, as Christians, are called to experience a bit of heaven on earth in living in a close relationship with our Creator. When we are walking with God, we experience His unsurpassing peace, His inexpressible joy, and His unfailing love. Those experiences are to be prized! The world has nothing better to offer.
What passes for “fun” in this world badly misses the mark and deprives people of the joy which can be experienced in following Jesus and doing what He would do.
As noted in Vanity: Ann Coulter’s Quest for Glory, Coulter has a problem subjecting her will to God’s. She would rather do what is right in her own eyes than in God’s. Ironically, Coulter concluded her “Breaking Bad” essay (in which she called that TV series “a Christian parable”) with Scripture: “There is a way that appears to be right, but in the end it leads to death.”
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